Posts tagged with "kuro koji"

mosaku
This is the first in a series of shochu reviews that will review products that we tried or obtained while in Japan in July on our Shochu Tour 2012. This particular bottle was a gift from my guide and translator's partner, who is from Kumamoto Prefecture and is justifiably proud of this local shochu. Read More...

tensonkurin
Tenson Kourin is one of the more affordable sweet potato shochus available in the U.S. At less than $20 per bottle, it's a true bargin. While many of the lower priced shochus have less flavor or complexity, Tenson Kourin does not suffer this fate. This was a product developed in 2001 specifically for the export market, though it is also sold within Japan. Read More...

Kitaya Shuzo
Kitaya Shuzo is a nihonshu (sake) and shochu producer in Fukuoka Prefecture and the first stop on our shochu distillery tour. Seikai Ishizuka and I traveled nearly an hour south of Hakata (main station in Fukouka City) on a commuter train to reach Yame, a city of less than 40,000 people in southern Fukuoka Prefecture. There we were met by a Kitaya representative who drove us to the distillery. Read More...

Kura No Shikon label
As a black koji sweet potato shochu aged in unglazed clay pots for a minimum of 3 years, this promises to be a full bodied, richly flavored, absolutely decadent imo shochu. And does it ever deliver. Read More...

isanishiki
Kuro Isanishki has the unmistakable earthy nose of an imo shochu. This yields to a buttery soft mouthfeel. Surprisingly supple given what's in store otherwise. An extremely light sweetness yields to a very dry, tight finish. The dryness would overwhelm except the soft mouth provides enough mellowness to create an interesting contrast. Read More...

tsukushi shiro
Tsukushi Shiro is one of four premium mugi shochus now being imported to the U.S. from Nishyoshida Shuzo. Tsukushi Shiro is also the most smooth, mellow, and easy drinking of the four thanks in no part to the low pressure distillation that sets it apart from its counterparts. All are made with black koji and local barley, but only Tsukushi Shiro is made using modern pressurized distillation techniques. Read More...

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