Posts tagged with "low pressure distillation"

kappa
What's in a name? It helps to understand the origins of Kappa No Sasoi Mizu, which is literally translated to "Kappa pump priming", but more subtly refers to the allure of the mythical Kappa, which will drown you if you come to close to the water (mizu). More subtly the Kappa is known to sometimes seduce women, which would explain this shochu most fully. Read More...

shiro1
There are not many junmai kuma-shochus available in the U.S. market. These are shochus made with polished Japanese rice, the same polishing process used in sake (nihon-shu) production. "Junmai" refers to rice that's been polished at least 70% (30% of the outer grain removed). Hakutake Shiro is made with rice polished to 60%. Only kome shochus produced in the Kuma River Valley can be designated as "kuma-shochu". Read More...

seirin_main_1
While iichiko silhouette is the first shochu we'd ever tried and remains a staple in introducing the uninitiated to the spirit, iichiko seirin is an even lighter mugi shochu made with the same distillation process, but cut to a lower 20% alcohol by volume with fresh spring water prior to bottling. Read More...

tsukushi shiro
Tsukushi Shiro is one of four premium mugi shochus now being imported to the U.S. from Nishyoshida Shuzo. Tsukushi Shiro is also the most smooth, mellow, and easy drinking of the four thanks in no part to the low pressure distillation that sets it apart from its counterparts. All are made with black koji and local barley, but only Tsukushi Shiro is made using modern pressurized distillation techniques. Read More...

Tombo
Tombo is the only honkaku (single distilled) shochu I know of that is not produced in Japan. It's also the only honkaku shochu, to my knowledge, made with North American barley. At $14.99 at my local liquor store no other honkaku shochu comes close to the price point. But don't let the nontraditional location or grain put you off. This is an authentic shochu. Read More...

IMG_1214 2
Toyonaga, the "Land of Plenty" shochu, is made by toji Jiro Toyonaga with premium milled Yamada Nishiki rice in the Kuma Valley (aka, Shochu Valley) of Kumamoto Prefecture, which gives it the special designation of being a kumajochu, which is to kome shochu what Champagne is to sparkling wine. Read More...

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