Posts tagged with "moromi"

yz office
The entire reason for this trip was to come learn how to make shochu. Tekkan-san, toji of Yamato Zakura Shuzo in Ichiki, Kagoshima Prefecture, was kind enough to allow me to come work under his instruction. I'd met him thanks to Komasa-san, president of Komasa Shuzo, one of the largest distilleries in Kagoshima. Read More...

IMG_9095
95% of Nishi Yoshida's production is barley shochu. They also make small runs of some niche products such as chestnut and carrot, but barley predominates. In the past they made sweet potato and rice shochu, but switched to barley in the 1980s, distilling for their own labels and for other shochu makers. Their production facility is also substantially smaller than Kitaya, producing approximately 1,200 kilo-liters per year. Read More...

Kitaya Shuzo
Kitaya Shuzo is a nihonshu (sake) and shochu producer in Fukuoka Prefecture and the first stop on our shochu distillery tour. Seikai Ishizuka and I traveled nearly an hour south of Hakata (main station in Fukouka City) on a commuter train to reach Yame, a city of less than 40,000 people in southern Fukuoka Prefecture. There we were met by a Kitaya representative who drove us to the distillery. Read More...

Kasadela_FB
  Japanese love their parties and they love their drinks. To show just how much, they have both a bonenkai (忘年会) and shinnenkai (新年会) parties. Bonenkai is a party to “forget” the past year, usually held in December. Shinnenkai is a party to welcome the new year, usually coinciding with the lunar (Chinese) new year. We had the good fortune to be invited to the Sake Shinnenkai hosted by certified sake sommelier (Kiki-Sake-Shi きき酒師) Chizuko Niikawa (photo on lower right) of Sake Discoveries. The event was held at Kasadela, a lovely izakaya in the Lower East Side (11th… Read More...

Senman
Yoroshiku Senman Arubeshi (aka, Hakkaisan Sannen Chozo) is a moromi shochu produced by Hakkaisan, one of the most popular sake brands in the U.S. This particular shochu is distilled from raw sake mash (moromi). The only difference between this shochu and one of Hakkaisan’s famous sakes is that it’s distilled instead of brewed. Read More...

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