Posts tagged with "shiro koji"

Kakushigura
Oak barrel aging has become a popular process as shochu producers experiment with different aging techniques to give their shochus unique flavor profiles. Kannoko and Ginza no Suzume Kohaku have full flavored profiles thanks to this aging process and are popular mugi shochus, particularly among whiskey drinkers. Kakushigura uses this process as well, but with a slightly different approach. Read More...

Tombo
Tombo is the only honkaku (single distilled) shochu I know of that is not produced in Japan. It's also the only honkaku shochu, to my knowledge, made with North American barley. At $14.99 at my local liquor store no other honkaku shochu comes close to the price point. But don't let the nontraditional location or grain put you off. This is an authentic shochu. Read More...

kinzangura
I really wish I had a better photo and more information about this delicious genshu imo shochu. The best we can come up with is that it is possibly called Kinzangura. It may be a special edition of their products since this particular JDM bottle does not appear anywhere on the distiller's website. Read More...

IMG_1214 2
Toyonaga, the "Land of Plenty" shochu, is made by toji Jiro Toyonaga with premium milled Yamada Nishiki rice in the Kuma Valley (aka, Shochu Valley) of Kumamoto Prefecture, which gives it the special designation of being a kumajochu, which is to kome shochu what Champagne is to sparkling wine. Read More...

kannoko
Kannoko is a single distilled normal pressure mugi shochu aged in oak barrels for 3 years before bottling. The oak gives the shochu its rich golden color and its faintly whiskey flavor. This is one of those aged mugis that whiskey drinkers will find familiar. Read More...

1_iichiko_roku
This iichiko silhouette is probably the most common Japanese shochu currently available in the United States. In NYC I’ve seen it in random mom & pop liquor stores as the only shochu among a shelf of sake options. It’s most commonly available in 750ml bottles, though I’ve seen other sizes in other countries. This is a great starter shochu, which is why I’ve chosen it for my first tasting note. It was my introduction to shochu back in 2008. I’d had Korean soju before, but Japanese shochu is a strikingly different (and better) experience. Read More...

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