Posts tagged with "shochu"

NakaNaka
Nakanaka is the main brand of barley shochu from the very well respected Kuroki Honten in Miyzaki, which makes a wide range of delicious shochu across two different distilleries, but under the same ownership. Their premium barley shochu, Hyakunen no Kodoku, a 40% ABV barrel aged barley shochu, is arguably the most famous barley shochu in Japan. Nakanaka takes a more straightforward approach with atmospheric distillation and 100% barley. Read More...

daikaya
Shochu'sday Returns in 2017 with a monthly schedule. Each event will be at a different bar or izakaya and each month will be a different theme. January starts with oyuwari shochu at Uminoie. February is maewari at 1 or 8 in Brooklyn. More to come ... Read More...

ShimaSenryo
Unique to the US market, Shima Senryo is a blend of white koji and black koji sweet potato shochu. While this blending style can be found more commonly in Japan, this is the only brand currently in the US that uses this unique approach. Blending has an interesting, but incompletely understood history in shochu production, but more and more distilleries are blending intentionally rather than as a way to cover up some off batches. Read More...

PT160_1095_03b
Naoki Sugimoto from Satsuma Shima Bijin, and Tekkan Wakamatsu from Yamatozakura will be visiting NYC and Hudson, NY to introduce their products to the US market. A weeklong series of tastings and pairing dinners will kick off on Monday, July 25th and run through Saturday, July 30th. Read More...

tantakatan
Tantakatan is an easy drinking shochu with distinct shiso notes and aromas, though it also carries a bit of seaweed funk in the nose. It's not as strongly shiso-flavored as you get form a shiso-infused shochu (Uminoie in NYC makes it in-house if you're ever hoping to try). Read More...

Shochusday
EDITED  September 19, 2016 to update schedule and locations. As I promised, exciting things are happening here at Kampai.US for 2016 and beyond. First off, “Shochu Tuesday” is no longer. Not only does that limit us to Tuesday, but it’s also not a particularly clever name. Fortunately, my Japanese shochu-loving friends, especially Noriyuki Yamashita, of Glocal Bar Imo Vibes, are more creative and also have a distinct linguistic advantage when it comes to this. In Japanese “tu” is pronounced “chu” – so Tuesday would be pronounced “Chuesday” – which is a short slide into “sho-chuesday” and with a bit… Read More...

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